Posts Tagged ‘Vehicle’

Ally: Drive With Confidence at Payne!

Monday, December 3rd, 2018

Ally is teaming up with Payne Auto Group to provide a limited warranty promotion for all used vehicles!

When you buy from Payne you are buying with CONFIDENCE! Receive 3,000 mile or 3 months (whichever comes first) warranty on your used vehicle. What does that mean?

  • This COMES STANDARD ON EVERY USED VEHICLE
  • Available when financing through ANY BANK
  • Exclusively at Payne
  • No qualifications required except to purchase at Payne
  • Available with ANY used car purchase from Payne
  • Basi Power Train Warranty Extended

And now with Ally, you’ll find even more coverage on all used vehicles offering coverage on the following:

Checking Your Automatic Transmission Fluid

Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

Transmission fluid is one of the most important fluids you need for your vehicle to run smoothly.

If your vehicle hesitates when your automatic transmission shifts gears, check the transmission fluid level before you let any mechanic start talking about servicing or adjusting your transmission or selling you a new one. To check your automatic transmission fluid, look for a dipstick handle sticking out of your transmission. This is located toward the rear of an in-line engine on vehicles with rear-wheel drive as shown here:

There are several types of fluid for the transmission. Each is made for a specific type of automatic transmission. Newer transmissions from the major automakers require different fluid than older ones. Because so many different kinds of transmissions are around these days, check your owner’s manual or dealership to find out which type of fluid your vehicle requires.

A faulty transmission and one that’s just low on fluid share many of the same symptoms! If your vehicle hesitates when your automatic transmission shifts gears, check the transmission fluid level before you let any mechanic start talking about servicing or adjusting your transmission or selling you a new one. Obviously, adding transmission fluid is a lot cheaper than replacing the whole transmission system! For more info on regular maintenance, check out this monthly checklist for your vehicle.

If your vehicle is in need of service, schedule an appointment online at any of our Service Centers.

How to Prepare Your Vehicle for the Winter

Thursday, November 1st, 2018

As the summer weather ebbs away and the air becomes crisp, you realize that winter is coming. 

Just as you prepare your home for the winter, you should prepare your vehicle as well! In this article, we will outline tips on how to properly winterize your vehicle.

Replace Fluids

It is very important to refill or replace the liquids in your vehicle.

  • Coolant – Making sure the right mixture of antifreeze and water will prevent freezing in your vehicle’s radiator.
  • Oil – As the temperatures drop, the oil in your car can expand and become thick. Some mechanics will recommend switching to a thinner oil if your area’s temperatures drop below freezing.
  • Wiper fluid – Make sure you replace your wiper fluid with freeze-resistant fluid

Check Tires

There are four kinds of tires you can choose from when it comes to seasonal tires:

  • All Season Tires – These are the most common and are perfect for areas that have mild winters.
  • All Weather Tires – These tires maintain good handling in both cold and heat and can be left on all year around.
  • Studded Winter Tires – These tires are only allowed from October 1 through April 30. The metal studs in the tires are used to help gain traction through icy areas.
  • Winter Tires – These tires are best used in moderate winter areas as they are made to trek through packed snow and rough ice. They are made from a compound that stays soft in cold conditions to help reduce tire problems due to the cold temperatures.

Check the Battery

Your battery can also be negatively affected due to cold winter temperatures. Be sure to look over your battery, battery cables, and battery fluid for any cracks or leaks. If your battery fluid is low, you can refill it with distilled water. If you notice you’re having a hard time turning your vehicle on, you may need to replace your battery.

Prepare an Emergency Winter Kit

It is always important to store an emergency kit in your car just in case. In this kit you should keep:

  • A flashlight
  • A blanket
  • Gloves and a hat
  • Batteries
  • First Aid kit
  • Ice scraper
  • Road flares
  • Jumper cables

Of course, you can always add to your winter kit with essentials tailor made for your family.

Conclusion

If your vehicle needs service, create an appointment online for any of our Service centers!

Keeping your vehicle winter ready is keeping your family safe, Regardless!

 

What To Do if Your Engine Stalls

Tuesday, October 30th, 2018

The engine is the most important mechanical part of any vehicle. The engine converts gas into motion and helps get the car running. It’s like the heart of the vehicle, making sure everything runs smoothly.

Though, without proper maintenance, your engine can stall and leave you stranded! Some of the reasons why your engine may have stalled could be:

  • An empty gas tank
  • Coolant sensor reading as hot
  • Bad battery
  • A bad fuel pump

It is very important that you keep up routine maintenance on your vehicle to avoid engine stalls and other mechanical failings.

What to Do if Your Engine Stalls

In the case that your engine stalls while you are driving, first you will lose power steering and power brakes. The first thing to do after turning on your hazard lights is to apply the footbrake and steer yourself out of traffic if you are in traffic. Next is try restarting your vehicle. If you cannot restart it on your own, call a friend for jumper cables. If the jumper cables do not work, then you should call a tow truck or roadside assistance for help.

If your vehicle stalls while you are idling, such as if you are at a stoplight, first you should turn on your hazards. Put your vehicle in ‘park’ and try to restart your vehicle. If that does not work, call for roadside assistance to help get your vehicle out of the way. You should not get out and try to push your vehicle out of the way by yourself.

Conclusion

It is always important to assess the situation before making any decisions. Never attempt to move your vehicle by yourself and always call for assistance when needed.

If your vehicle needs service, schedule maintenance online at any of our Payne service locations.

Tire Repair Kits: What To Know

Tuesday, October 9th, 2018

In the past, automakers equipped vehicles with a full or small spare tire. Nowadays, automakers are opting for a small tire repair kits instead. Though, having a tire repair kit in your vehicle isn’t such a bad idea.

There are many tire repair kits out on the market today and each does different things. In this article, we will outline the various tire repair kits and what each of them does.

Aerosol Inflators

Aerosol inflators are used to pump a sealant into a flat tire, plugging small punctures from the inside. Aerosol inflators have grown in popularity due to the easy-to-use nature and readily available nature of the product.

Pressurized-can sealers, such as the ubiquitous Fix-A-Flat, are one-time-use products that have a dispensing tube that screws to a tire’s air-inflation valve. These sealers can both patch a hole and inflate the tire. [X]

Tire-sealant kits combine a portable 12-volt air compressor and a replaceable container of sealant. More and more new cars supply this kind of kit in lieu of a spare tire. [X]

It is important to note that aerosol inflators should only be utilized for very small holes in the tread of the tire. These products should not and cannot be used to fix holes more that 6mm big or for tears on the sidewall of the tire.

Another thing to note is that once you use these products, you must take your vehicle to a professional soon. Typically at 100 miles or so after use, go by what the instructions on the product state. The professional must clean out the residue from the product left behind on the wheel and inside the tire.

Tire Plugs and Patches

The biggest pro of using a tire plug is the cost. Tire plug kits are some of the cheapest on the market today. Tire plugs are made of short strips of leather covered with a gooey, unvulcanized rubber compound. When forced into a nail hole, the plug fills the hole and the rubber goo vulcanizes under the heat of driving to fully seal the repair. [X]

Tire patches, on the other hand, are usually done by professionals as the patch goes on the inside of the tire. This fix is generally the most reliable when it comes to tire repair and the strongest and most effective repair. Though, unless you have the tools to remove the tire from the rim, you cannot patch a tire yourself.

Conclusion

There are a few options out there if you want or need to plug a small hole in your tire. There is always the professional option and Road Side Assistance if you’re in a real pickle.

If you want to get your tires examined, please schedule an appointment online with our Service Center!

5 Things Every Teen Driver Should Know

Monday, October 8th, 2018

So your teen just got their license and is feeling on top of the world! They eagerly ask you if they could take the car out to go to the mall or go visit friends, but, like all parents, you hesitate.

Teen drivers are statistically more at risk than adult drivers due to their inexperience. According to research conducted by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 16- to 17-year old drivers are nine times more likely to be involved in a crash than adults and six times more likely to be involved in a fatal crash than adults.

Of course, when parents become involved in teaching their children safe driving, these statistics become less shocking.

Teaching your teens what to look out for and how to be safe on the road not only protects your child but also their passengers and others around them.

Here are three tips for protecting your teen driver.

Minimize Distractions

Minimizing distractions is the number one thing that can help teen drivers stay safe. Some of these distractions include using cell phones, having rowdy friends in the car, or even eating while driving.

Minimizing distractions can greatly reduce the chances of getting in a car accident. While your teen may have the ability to drive alone now, parents should instill rules for using the vehicle.

Drive Defensively

It’s important to reinforce driving defensively. This means keeping a safe distance away from the car in front, obeying all traffic signs and traffic rules, and generally just being aware of the surroundings.

With time and practice comes wisdom, and teen drivers need to keep up what they learned in defensive driving in “real world” situations.

Vehicle Maintenence

Driving is a privilege, and your teen should treat the vehicle as such. This means teaching your teen the basics of car maintenance.

Teaching your teens routine maintenance can really help them out in case they encounter an emergency. Some tips you can teach your teen about are:

  • How to change your vehicle’s oil
  • How to check fluid levels
  • How to change a flat tire
  • How to use a tire repair kit

These tips can really help your teen navigate any kind of problem they can encounter.

Conclusion

In conclusion, while your teen may have their license, they aren’t equipped with the knowledge and wisdom of navigating the road.

It is the job of parents to help prepare their teen driver for the wide open road!

If you’re looking for a great vehicle for your teen, visit our website and schedule a test drive once you find the perfect vehicle!

What Does Horsepower Actually Mean?

Tuesday, September 25th, 2018

History of Horsepower

Did you know that “one horsepower” doesn’t actually equal the power of one horse?

Scottish engineer James Watt (yes, the same guy who the energy label “watt” is named after) decided to use the term horsepower to compare the output of steam engines to that of a workhorse. Eventually, the term was expanded to include that of pistons, turbines and other electric gears that are found in vehicles.

But what does “one horsepower” equal? According to Watt, horsepower is meant to equal the “amount of power that a horse can sustain for an extended period of time.”

Although James Watt’s original formula for horsepower can’t quite measure everything a car engine can do today, car manufacturers still use horsepower because it’s a consistent unit of measure. Horsepower today can’t tell us everything we need to know about a vehicle, but it can be useful in comparing models.

How We Use Horsepower Today

What we use horsepower to measure today is a vehicle’s acceleration. High-performance models, like the Ford Mustang and Chevy Camaro, always make sure to let the competition know how much horsepower their models get. Though, as said earlier, there’s more to a car than just horsepower. Torque is also a big factor in high-performance vehicles.

Horsepower is how fast you can go, torque is how far you will go. Essentially, torque is a force and horsepower is the rate at which the engine does work.

When it comes to seeing how fast a vehicle is, different factors matter. You need to look at top speed, acceleration, torque, power, gearing, RPM’s and a whole slew of other factors that work together.

When searching for a high-performance vehicle, horsepower is only one factor you should look at. Think of the vehicle as a puzzle where all the pieces work together to create a bigger picture. Overall, power is what really determines performance.

If you’re looking for a high-performance vehicle, please visit our website: Payne Auto Group

 

 

How to Clean Flood Damage from Your Vehicle Interior

Monday, September 24th, 2018

The Rio Grande Valley has been subject to flooding this year. With flooding comes a terrible loss of property, one of which could be flood damage to your car.

After the rain has subsided and the flood waters have gone done, recovering your car should become one of your main priorities. The earlier you start recovering your car from the flood damage, the better. There are a few things you must do to ensure you clean your car out properly.

Survey the Damage

When the weather permits and the flood water has subsided, survey your vehicle for damage. Open up your vehicle and remove everything that isn’t attached. This means removing papers, trash, car mats and other various items you have in your car.

Next, determine how bad the damage is. Press down on the carpets and seats to see how saturated with water they are. Flood damage can wreak havoc on a car’s interior, causing mold, rust and other problems dangerous to you and your vehicle. Take a wet/dry vac to remove out any standing water and to vacuum the interiors.

If your vehicle is completely saturated with water, you may have to go in and remove all carpet and the seats. This can help you spot detail and help your car dry out faster.

Create Air Flow

Once you have your vehicle stripped down to the basics, it’s now time to really air out your car. Increase the airflow going through your vehicle by setting up a fan on one side of your vehicle. To help things go faster, you can set up multiple fans around your vehicle to get the airflow going.

You should leave the fans going for at least a day in order to ensure proper ventilation and drying. Another thing you should consider is using compressed air to get water out of tight spots. This can help reduce rusting and mold in smaller and tighter spaces that a wet/dry vac can’t get to.

Deodorize Your Vehicle and Spot Treat

Once your vehicle is thoroughly dry, it’s time to deodorize. Ideally, you should go back in and shampoo your carpets and upholstery. Although this may seem counterintuitive to get things wet again, shampooing your upholstery and carpet can kill lingering bacteria that can breed mold.

There are also other deodorizing products that can help, not only with the smell but with keeping away excess moisture. Baking soda is a great product to use when spot treating your vehicle.

Conclusion

Overall, treating a flood-damaged car is hard work. There are many alternatives to treating your vehicle, such as making a claim through your insurance or taking it to a professional to clean out your vehicle.

If you want to get the damage to your vehicle surveyed by professionals, please visit our Collision Center!

Winter Tires vs. All-Season Tires

Wednesday, September 19th, 2018

As the season’s change, so should your car! Preparing your car to work in winter weather is essential to your safety. As the rain, sleet, and snow start coming, it’s important to keep your tires in tip-top shape. Winter tires and all-season tires are both viable options when preparing your vehicle for the colder weather. But what’s the difference between the two? In this article, we’ll outline both winter and all-season tires and which would be better for you.

Winter Tires

Winter tires are specially formulated to work in harsh winter conditions. This means that winter tires excel at navigating through snow, sleet, and other freezing temperatures. As the temperature drops, the weather affects the tread on rubber tires, making them less pliable and more susceptible to skidding. Around 45°F (7°C), the rubber on regular tires becomes less effective. Winter tires are made of a more flexible rubber that doesn’t get affected by the cold temperatures, making them perfect for traveling through snow. Winter tires also have a deeper tread depth and biting edges, making it easier to avoid snow buildup and easier to drive on ice.

All-Season Tires

Most vehicles are outfitted with all-season tires when they leave the factory. All-season tires are formatted to work in a variety of weather elements, such as rain, heat, and snow. Although this is a blanket remedy, meaning that all-season tires do not excel in harsher elements. This means that all-season tires work best in mild-weather conditions, such as rain and light snow. All-season tires offer a moderate tread depth, a longer tread life, and performs well in wet and dry conditions.

So, Which is Best?

It really depends on what weather you encounter the most of! If you live in an area that sees extreme winters that carry a lot of snow, winter tires are best for you. If you live in an area that has mild winter conditions, then all-season tires would work best for you.

If you’d like to schedule a service appointment to get new tires for your vehicle, please visit our website!

Auto Finance 101: Which Down Payment is Right for You?

Monday, October 9th, 2017
down payment

You’ve chosen the perfect vehicle, and now all that’s standing in the way is the small matter of payment. If you’re financing a new or used vehicle, the issue of down payments will arise. But just like many aspects of selecting a vehicle, down payments can be complex! Is a down payment necessary? How much will it be? And how is this amount calculated? Here are a few things you should know about down payments before you drive off in your new or used car or truck.

While it was once true that the typical down payment for a new vehicle hovered somewhere around 20%, that is simply not the case now. Many factors will determine which is the right down payment for you and the vehicle you’ve got your eye on. These days, many drivers are putting forth no more than a 10% down payment to purchase their dream car, while others offer a down payment of somewhere in the middle. You’ll need to ask yourself several questions before finding the magic number.

What down payment can you afford?

A down payment of 20% may be impossible with your current income. That’s OK. Dealerships offer a wide range of finance options to make sure you don’t sign up for more than you can handle. Payne is one of them! Contact our finance department for more info.

Will you purchase GAP Insurance?

If you’ll be purchasing GAP insurance for your new vehicle, you can probably get away with a down payment of about 10%. This is because GAP insurance will cover the cost of your vehicle should it be totaled. Car insurance is a whole other ball game, so you’ll want to consult closely with your dealership’s finance department about this issue.

What is Zero Down?

Got good credit? You may be in for a pleasant surprise with zero down. This means that you’re not obligated to give a down payment. A couple of drawbacks to this include higher monthly payments and probably, higher finance charges. You won’t have to save up for months, though, meaning you’ll get your new car sooner than expected. If you do go down the Zero Down route, consider GAP insurance to cover the difference. This is a great option for first time buyers!

 

Ready to take a new vehicle for a spin? Visit your local Ed Payne auto dealership to view our wide selection of new and used models! Or if you need service on your current vehicle, call us to schedule an appointment!